VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219/7219 (Page 2)

Filming Beside Still Waters 

(r-l) Beck Bennett and Reid Scott

Actor and fine art photographer Chris Lowell was well aware that a young man struggling with the death of his parents could be considered a filmic trope, particularly in the low-budget realm of movies. So, for his feature film directing debut, Beside Still Waters, which won Best Narrative Feature at the 2013 Austin Film Festival, he sought to elevate it above the usual fare by shooting on KODAK Motion Picture Film, going so far as to have the aesthetic of celluloid imbue his main character in the ensemble comedy-drama with a sense of longing.

“Our protagonist is woefully nostalgic and stuck in the romanticism of the past, and it is holding him back,” Lowell explains. “Film was able to evoke those feelings for us.”

Michael Goi on Creating the Freak Show for American Horror Story 

(L-R) Jyoti Amge as Ma Petite, Naomi Grossman as Pepper. CR: Michele K. Short/FX

For the better part of a decade now, Ryan Murphy has been innovating the way audiences look at small screen entertainment. As the creator of shows like Popular, Nip/Tuck, Glee,and The New Normal, Murphy has established a distinctive brand of filmmaking that’s faster, louder, and more attention-grabbing than its television contemporaries, and one that puts compelling visuals on par with addictive storylines. Case in point: American Horror Story, Murphy’s television show/miniseries hybrid that plays more like a horror anthology with a new theme each season. In season one it was Murder House, which was followed by Asylum and Coven. And this fall, Freak Show premiered with what Murphy describes as “the most terrifying clown of all time.”

Michael Goi, ASC, ISC has been there since nearly the beginning, shooting the second half of American Horror Story’s first season after first collaborating with Murphy on Glee. “American Horror Story had a visual style and approach for season one that was already established by the time I came on to it,” says Goi. “I didn’t make a lot of alterations to it, but in the last two or three episodes I started to veer in the direction that I felt like the material was taking me, and some of that approach is what’s reflected in season two, Asylum, where you’re dealing with an atmosphere that was very crazed. And I think the camerawork and the lighting reflected that a lot.”

St. Vincent Calls for a Human Look

JAEDEN LIEBERHER and BILL MURRAY star in ST. VINCENT© 2014 The Weinstein Company. All Rights Reserved. / Photo: Atsushi Nishijima

Among his many iconic credits as a cinematographer, John Lindley, ASC counts memorable films like Father of the Bride, Mr. Brooks, Pleasantville, You’ve Got Mail, Sleeping with the Enemy, and Field of Dreams in his repertoire. His most recent endeavor is St. Vincent, in which Bill Murray plays a gone-to-seed war veteran who has an influence on a young boy who lives next door. That influence is unwelcome to the boy’s recently divorced parents.

There’s comedy in that conflict, and eventually, an unlikely friendship develops. The cast also includes Melissa McCarthy.

Dracula Untold - A Gothic Tale Gets a New Twist from John Schwartzman, ASC

Published on website: October 10, 2014
Categories: VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219/7219 , The StoryBoard Blog
John Schwartzman, ASC on the set of Dracula Untold (Photo: Jasin Boland © Universal Pictures)

Universal Pictures’ Dracula Untold reveals the origins of Bram Stoker’s infamous vampire Dracula. Starring Luke Evans (Fast & Furious 6, The Hobbit series) as Vlad the Impaler, audiences learn the catalyst behind his transformation into the all-powerful creature of the night.

Insight: Tom Luse - on producing The Walking Dead in Super 16

Published on website: October 08, 2014
Categories: 16mm , Television , Focus On Film , VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219/7219
Tom Luse - The Walking Dead _ Season 4, Episode 5 _ BTS - Photo Credit: Gene Page/AMC

Though he didn’t know it at the time, producer Tom Luse began preparing for a career in show business in college, when he was charged with the enviable task of popping the popcorn at an art house cinema in his hometown of Atlanta. “I liked movies, but it wasn’t something I had planned on going into,” explains the EMMY®-nominated producer. “But later, in graduate school, I had the opportunity to study film and ended up getting a degree in Communications.”

While these days it’s being an executive producer on The Walking Dead that keeps Luse busy (he’s been with the show since the very beginning), he has dabbled in a variety of job titles over the years. “I wanted to be a technician originally, and ended up working in the camera department as a grip,” Luse recalls. “I found that my skills were really in organizing things and thinking ahead, which eventually led me into location management, then into production management, and then into producing.” As he readied for the fifth season of The Walking Dead, Luse spoke with us about lighting a post-apocalyptic universe, the cost of time, and why zombies look better on film.