VISION3 50D Color Negative Film 5203/7203

Ask a Filmmaker: David Dart, NFL Films - Answers

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David Dart, NFL Films staff cinematographer

The questions are in and the answers are back! A big Thank You to NFL Films cinematographer Dave Dart for taking the time during playoffs to answer questions from our readers! You all came up with some great ones with topics including focus pulling, film stock preference, shooting style, and the romanticism of football on film.

There's a reason NFL Films has won over 100 Emmy® awards, and here's a sneak peak at how they do it!

HBO’s True Detective Elevates the Television Drama

Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey.(Photos courtesy HBO/James Bridges.)

HBO continues its run of cinematic originals in 2014 with the eight-episode series True Detective. Written by acclaimed novelist Nic Pizzolatto and set in southern Louisiana, the series stars Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson as two detectives thrust together in a 17-year search for a serial killer.

Cary Fukunaga directs with Australian cinematographer Adam Arkapaw guiding the visuals. Arkapaw, with the features Lore, The Snowtown Murders and Animal Kingdom under his belt, recently garnered an EMMY® Award for his work on the 2013 series Top of the Lake.

Abby for Apples is Homegrown in New York State

Published on website: November 18, 2013
Categories: 16mm , Commercials , Focus On Film , VISION3 50D Color Negative Film 5203/7203
Abby Wambach stars in “Abby for Apples.”

Soccer star Abby Wambach was “homegrown in New York State, just like New York apples,” exactly what the New York Apple Association was looking for when choosing a spokesperson. Wambach, the greatest goal scorer in international soccer history, is currently leading a multi-platform campaign for the trade association that includes commercials, radio spots, print ads, and point-of-purchase displays. The 30-second television spot, “Abby for Apples,” is headlining the campaign.

The commercial features Wambach and a group of children enjoying apples and soccer in an orchard located in Upstate New York. When director Ray Manard took on the project, he knew very early on that he wanted to use film for the spot. “The shoot was all outside, so weather was obviously going to be an unpredictable factor,” explains Manard. “Based on the schedule, we knew there would definitely be some high-contrast sun situations to deal with, and film, absolutely, would be able to handle that, the way only film can.”

Stuart Dryburgh Frames WWII Vignette in Emperor

Matthew Fox and Eriko Hatsune. (Photos by Kirsty Griffin ©2013 Roadside Attractions. All rights reserved.)

At the end of World War II, General Douglas MacArthur made a difficult decision to spare the life of Japanese Emperor Hirohito. That is the historical setting of Emperor, a new feature film directed by Peter Webber (Girl with a Pearl Earring) and photographed by Stuart Dryburgh, NCZS, ASC (The Piano, Aeon Flux, Amelia).

Of equal importance in the film is the smaller, human story of General Bonner Fellers, the man MacArthur assigns to investigate the matter, and Fellers’ relationship with Aya Shimada, a Japanese woman he met years earlier. Fellers eventually risks his career in his search for Aya. Matthew Fox plays Fellers, and Eriko Hatsune is Aya. Tommy Lee Jones is entertainingly gruff as MacArthur.

The Unique Perspective of Lee Daniels’ The Butler

Forest Whitaker. (Photo by Annie Marie Fox. © 2013 The Weinstein Company. All rights reserved.)

The last time director Lee Daniels and cinematographer Andrew Dunn, BSC teamed up was on the film Precious, which earned six ACADEMY AWARD® nominations, including one for best picture. “That film was special, and it meant a lot to people,” recalls Dunn. “It changed some lives.”

The duo’s latest collaboration is the extraordinary story of Cecil Gaines, who served eight presidents as the head butler of the White House from 1952 to 1986. The film begins in the cotton fields of Gaines’ youth and reaches a climax when Gaines returns to the White House at age 92 to meet an African-American president. Forest Whitaker plays the title role.

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