VISION3 50D Color Negative Film 5203/7203

Apatow and Lipes Choose Classic Look for Trainwreck

Photo © Universal Pictures. Amy Schumer and Bill Hader star in Trainwreck.

Trainwreck is the latest Judd Apatow-directed comedy to hit the big screen. As a director, Apatow’s smashing success in the comedy realm includes The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Knocked Up, Funny People and This is 40. In the producer role, he has had a hand in a long string of other hit comedies including Bridesmaids, Superbad, Forgetting Sarah Marshall, Pineapple Express, and he is known as a pioneer in the “bromantic comedy” genre.

This time around, Apatow has built a film around a female lead. In Trainwreck, Amy Schumer, who also wrote the script, plays a semi-autobiographical character who is extremely commitment-phobic, tending to sabotage any budding relationship. When she meets a good man, she must face her fears. The cast also includes Tilda Swinton, Bill Hader, Brie Larson, Colin Quinn, Marisa Tomei, and LeBron James. The shoot was mounted in New York City over the course about 53 days.

Super 16 Grit Seizes Look of Hostage Drama

Joe Anderson portrays Garrett Tully. (Photo by Rodney Taylor, ASC.)

When Rodney Taylor read the script for Supremacy, he saw a story that could benefit from Super 16 origination and a gritty, handheld aesthetic. The cinematographer mentioned Black Swan, The Hurt Locker and a couple of other recent Super 16 films in his first meeting with Deon Taylor, the basketball player-turned-director. He immediately liked the idea, even though the film had been budgeted for digital video.

Supremacy is the hard-hitting story of a white supremacist, recently paroled, who takes an African-American family hostage. The filmmakers found some Gordon Parks documentary photographs that had an edgy, dimly lit mood with an ominous hint of violence, and used them as a starting point for developing a look for the film.

Cinderella: A Disney Classic Brought to Life

Kenneth Branagh, Haris Zambarloukos, BSC and Lily James on the set of Disney’s live-action feature inspired by the classic fairy tale, Cinderella. (Photos by Jonathan Olley, ©Disney Enterprises, Inc. All Rights Reserved.)

Together, Haris Zambarloukos, BSC and Kenneth Branagh have made the otherworldly Marvel pic Thor, the stylish Michael Caine vehicle Sleuth, and the spy thriller Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit. Each of those projects also was made on 35mm film. Their latest collaboration, a live-action update of Disney’s Cinderella, adds yet another completely different project to their body of work.

When he got the call, Zambarloukos was initially hesitant. “When I read the script, I began to realize what a great opportunity it was,” he says. “It’s an ancient, timeless story with versions in many cultures. Within Disney’s version of the tale is a tragic orphan story that is almost Dickensian. And after our first meeting, I realized why Ken wanted to do it – it’s a chance to make a classic, the first of its kind, in a new way. It’s a big responsibility.”

Mandy Walker Recreates the Western Genre for Jane Got a Gun 

Director Gavin O'Connor and Mandy Walker, ASC, ACS

In Jane Got a Gun, a woman must turn to her former fiancé for help in defending her new family. The film, which stars Natalie Portman and Ewan MacGregor, gave Mandy Walker, ASC, ACS an opportunity to work in the Western genre, something many cinematographers dream of doing.

“There’s something unique and iconic about cowboys riding horses across the landscape, or tracking low angle on people confronting each other in a cowboy hat with a couple of guns,” she says. “I think all DPs would love to tackle the genre at some stage.”

Belling Hits the Right Notes for Songs She Wrote About People She Knows

Published on website: October 08, 2014
Categories: VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219/7219 , VISION3 50D Color Negative Film 5203/7203

Since Amy Belling’s first film premiered at the 2003 Toronto International Film Festival, she has been both a producer and cinematographer. Belling finds an ease and a challenge in playing dual roles. On her most recent endeavor, the musical comedy Songs She Wrote About People She Knows, it was par for the course.

“My producer brain never shuts off completely,” she explains. “It can be a hindrance to the creative process of directing and cinematography, but on the flip side, being a producer, and having built the budget and negotiated most of the vendor deals, it can be a huge asset in troubleshooting.”

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