VISION3 50D Color Negative Film 5203/7203

Hand of God Shoots Film for a Timeless Feel

Emayatzy Corinealdo and Ron Perlman in "Hand of God". (Credit: Adam Rose/Amazon Studios.)

Amazon Studios’ Hand of God, which stars Ron Perlman as a corrupt, born-again judge who becomes a vigilante, is the latest example of original production by an online streaming entity. Making his television directorial debut, the pilot was directed by Marc Forster (World War Z, The Kite Runner, Finding Neverland) and photographed in a film-noir style by Matthias Koenigswieser. Viewers of the premiere episode were asked to give opinions on Hand of God before the decision to proceed with the series was made, and soon season one, consisting of nine episodes, was moving forward.

The story takes place in a small town in California where an economic bust makes the populace desperate. Joining the production team for the episodes was Rasmus Heise, a member of the Danish Society of Cinematographers whose work has garnered an impressive array of accolades. Helium, his live-action short with director Anders Walter, won an OSCAR® in 2014.

Jurassic World Calls for 65 mm Film

CHRIS PRATT is surrounded by raptors in "Jurassic World". Photo Credit: Chuck Zlotnick/Universal Pictures and Amblin Entertainment, Inc. Copyright: © 2014 Universal Studios and Amblin Entertainment, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

John Schwartzman, ASC has more than 35 studio feature films to his credit, including Seabiscuit, which earned him an Oscar® nomination, and The Rock, Armageddon, Saving Mr. Banks, and Dracula Untold – all shot on film. One of the executive producers on his most recent assignment, Jurassic World, was Steven Spielberg. So when Schwartzman proposed shooting on film, it seemed like an obvious choice.

“I had some previous experience shooting very big budget movies in Hawaii, on Pearl Harbor,” he says. “I knew the contrast ratios of day exteriors in Hawaii, and almost everything we were going to shoot in Hawaii was day exterior. We were there for the big vistas and the scope and all of the things that you can’t do on stage. Nothing else was going to capture the 18,000 footcandles in the highlights of the sky, and the 20 footcandles in the shadows of the jungle, in the same shot. I didn’t have to choose to preserve either the highlights or the shadows. I knew that if I placed my exposure where I thought it should be, I was going to have all of that information there. Film was simply the right tool.”

Apatow and Lipes Choose Classic Look for Trainwreck

Photo © Universal Pictures. Amy Schumer and Bill Hader star in Trainwreck.

Trainwreck is the latest Judd Apatow-directed comedy to hit the big screen. As a director, Apatow’s smashing success in the comedy realm includes The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Knocked Up, Funny People and This is 40. In the producer role, he has had a hand in a long string of other hit comedies including Bridesmaids, Superbad, Forgetting Sarah Marshall, Pineapple Express, and he is known as a pioneer in the “bromantic comedy” genre.

This time around, Apatow has built a film around a female lead. In Trainwreck, Amy Schumer, who also wrote the script, plays a semi-autobiographical character who is extremely commitment-phobic, tending to sabotage any budding relationship. When she meets a good man, she must face her fears. The cast also includes Tilda Swinton, Bill Hader, Brie Larson, Colin Quinn, Marisa Tomei, and LeBron James. The shoot was mounted in New York City over the course about 53 days.

Super 16 Grit Seizes Look of Hostage Drama

Joe Anderson portrays Garrett Tully. (Photo by Rodney Taylor, ASC.)

When Rodney Taylor read the script for Supremacy, he saw a story that could benefit from Super 16 origination and a gritty, handheld aesthetic. The cinematographer mentioned Black Swan, The Hurt Locker and a couple of other recent Super 16 films in his first meeting with Deon Taylor, the basketball player-turned-director. He immediately liked the idea, even though the film had been budgeted for digital video.

Supremacy is the hard-hitting story of a white supremacist, recently paroled, who takes an African-American family hostage. The filmmakers found some Gordon Parks documentary photographs that had an edgy, dimly lit mood with an ominous hint of violence, and used them as a starting point for developing a look for the film.

Cinderella: A Disney Classic Brought to Life

Kenneth Branagh, Haris Zambarloukos, BSC and Lily James on the set of Disney’s live-action feature inspired by the classic fairy tale, Cinderella. (Photos by Jonathan Olley, ©Disney Enterprises, Inc. All Rights Reserved.)

Together, Haris Zambarloukos, BSC and Kenneth Branagh have made the otherworldly Marvel pic Thor, the stylish Michael Caine vehicle Sleuth, and the spy thriller Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit. Each of those projects also was made on 35mm film. Their latest collaboration, a live-action update of Disney’s Cinderella, adds yet another completely different project to their body of work.

When he got the call, Zambarloukos was initially hesitant. “When I read the script, I began to realize what a great opportunity it was,” he says. “It’s an ancient, timeless story with versions in many cultures. Within Disney’s version of the tale is a tragic orphan story that is almost Dickensian. And after our first meeting, I realized why Ken wanted to do it – it’s a chance to make a classic, the first of its kind, in a new way. It’s a big responsibility.”



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