Television

“Troubles” Avoided for Syfy’s Haven in Nova Scotia

A scene from Haven. (Photo: Michael Tompkins)

The Syfy series Haven, based on the Stephen King novella The Colorado Kid, takes viewers to the mythical town of Haven, Maine. There the series follows FBI agent Audrey Parker (Emily Rose), who arrives in town to follow a routine case but soon finds herself caught up in the town’s many mysteries. Audrey quickly discovers that Haven is a longtime refugee for people affected by a range of supernatural afflictions known as “Troubles,” and she herself has a surprising connection to the town.

The series, which just completed its fourth season, is shot entirely in Nova Scotia, Canada, in and around the town of Chester. When the decision was made to shoot in Nova Scotia, Executive Producer Shawn Piller (Stephen King’s Dead Zone, Greek) turned to cinematographer Eric Cayla, CSC, whom he had worked with on a previous series.

Ask a Filmmaker: David Dart, NFL Films - Answers

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David Dart, NFL Films staff cinematographer

The questions are in and the answers are back! A big Thank You to NFL Films cinematographer Dave Dart for taking the time during playoffs to answer questions from our readers! You all came up with some great ones with topics including focus pulling, film stock preference, shooting style, and the romanticism of football on film.

There's a reason NFL Films has won over 100 Emmy® awards, and here's a sneak peak at how they do it!

Ask a Filmmaker: David Dart, NFL Films

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David Dart, NFL Films staff cinematographer

The 2013 football season is underway, and the crew at NFL Films is busy capturing all the leaping catches, goal line stands, pre-game pep talks, and sideline celebrations. Considered the gold standard of sports filmmaking, NFL Films strives to not just document the game, but to preserve it, and carry on the legacy of all those who have helped make the game what it is today. And motion picture film is part of that legacy.

Since 1962, NFL Films has captured and archived over 100 million feet of 16mm film. Their productions were the first to use ground-level slow motion, shoot sports with 600mm lenses, and to incorporate reverse-angle replays. Can you imagine shooting the Super Bowl handheld with a 1,000-foot magazine and a 50-500mm anamorphic zoom lens? Ever wonder what it is like to capture the fast-moving, hard-hitting action of the NFL? Now is your chance to get full access with NFL Films cinematographer David Dart.

Filmmakers Win Right to Choose Super 16 for Television

Published on website: November 26, 2013
Categories: 16mm , Industry , Television , The StoryBoard Blog

A recent campaign to reinstate Super 16mm film for broadcast in Europe has resulted in victory with all major UK broadcasters agreeing to accept programs originated on the format.

“This is an exciting resolution for filmmakers, who now have complete freedom to choose the right aesthetic format for telling their stories,” notes Andrew Evenski, president and GM of Kodak’s Entertainment & Commercial Films division. “Storytellers understand the power of 16mm film, and can take full advantage of the beauty, flexibility and budget-friendly benefits that this format offers.”

Film Rolls on Another Football Season

Published on website: September 05, 2013
Categories: 16mm , Matt Stoffel , Television , The StoryBoard Blog

With more than 45 seasons and more than 100 Emmy® awards under their belts, NFL Films rolls camera on a new season of touchdowns, goal-line stands, and all the other thrilling moments that entrance football fans.

16mm KODAK VISION3 Color Negative Film will be running through their cameras tonight for NFL Films' trademark cinematic shots that put you in the stadium and on the field. They will be shooting 32 and 48 frames per second, and when the game clock runs out the footage will be sent back to One Sabol Way in New Jersey for processing and review. For the seventeen weeks of the regular season and beyond, t