The Artist Wins the Academy Award® Best Picture

Published on website: February 28, 2012
Categories: Alyson Shurtliff , Awards , The StoryBoard Blog
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Oscar®-winning actor Jean Dujardin, winner for Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role for his role in "The Artist," backstage during the 84th Annual Academy Awards Awards®, broadcast live on the ABC Television Network from the Hollywood and Highland Center, in Hollywood, CA, Sunday, February 26, 2012. Photo: Richard Harbaugh

The Artist claimed the best picture award at this year's Academy Awards® and was shot on KODAK VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219. In addition to the best picture, The Artist also won Oscars® in other marquee categories – including best director, Michel Hazanavicius and best actor, Jean Dujardin.

In the 84-year history of Oscar, no Oscar®-winning best picture has ever been made without motion picture film, a tradition that continues with The Artist. From the looks of these photos, the filmmakers enjoyed themselves on Hollywood’s biggest night.

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Oscar®-winning director Michel Hazanavicius, winner for Achievement in Directing for work done on "The Artist"; Bérénice Bejo, Oscar-nominee for Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role at the Governors Ball after 84th Annual Academy Awards® from the Hollywood and Highland Center in Hollywood, CA, Sunday, February 26, 2012. ©A.M.P.A.S.

Guillaume Schiffman, AFC said the most important contribution to the overall look and feel of The Artist was the decision to shoot film.

“I made some tests, and it was immediately obvious that we needed the texture of film stock,” he says. “I wanted soft whites and deep blacks, but not so much contrast that the image begins to look like HD. I experimented with some digitally shot images, and they were too sharp. I was fighting against the sharpness.”

In this InCamera Online article, Schiffman recounts how he recreated the silent era by creating black-and-white images on color film stock.